Your child 3-5 years

A hope for children allergic to peanut


A note of optimism for all children allergic to peanut. English researchers have managed to desensitize some of them by gradually reintroducing groundnuts. A protocol already applied in France. (News of the 04/02/14)

  • While about 1% of children are allergic to peanuts in France, English researchers have just published a study with very promising results. Dr. Anagnostou of Cambridge University and his team have tested an oral immunotherapy protocol with 85 allergic children. Gradually, for six months, they fed them a meal of peanut protein so that their immune system could get used to the allergen. The children went from 2 mg at the beginning of the study (about 1 / 70th of peanut), to 800 mg at the end. Each new catch more important than the previous was done in the hospital so that the doctors can intervene in case of reaction.
  • After six monthsmore than 84% of these children could eat 5 peanuts a day and almost one in two could eat 10 peanuts a day.

Promising results in France too

  • These English researchers are not the first to experiment with this method of reintroduction. The allergy service of Saint-Vincent-de-Paul Hospital in Lille has been doing the same since 2005: "We were among the first to experiment with this protocol of gradual reintroduction", explains Christine Sauvage Delebarre, head of this service. The principle is the same as at the University of Cambridge: "It's about giving children micro amounts of the allergen in gradually increasing doses so that their immune system learns to tolerate it." Our particularity in Lille, c is that we use for this Curlys, the famous salty cakes that children love, "says the specialist.
  • And the results are more than encouraging : "After 6 months of protocol, which consists of reintroducing the allergen up to 1 / 10th of the tolerance level of the child, 90% exceed this threshold and 60% double it.For others, it will take more than time, but our goal is to allow them to return to a normal life by not fearing to accidentally fall on peanut ", concludes Christine Sauvage Delebarre.

Stéphanie Letellier